The Sentinel

THE OFFICIAL BLOG OF THE SOCIETY FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY OF CANCER (SITC).

Wednesday, March 16, 2022

Letter from the Editor - March

Hello JITC Readers,

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Welcome to the latest edition of the JITC digest. If any of our readers will be in New Orleans next month for the 2022 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, we hope you will stop by the SITC booth in the exhibition hall for an opportunity to interact in person with JITC Deputy Editor-in-Chief Dr. James L. Gulley during one of our two Meet the Editor Sessions scheduled for 11:50 a.m.–12:20 p.m. on Monday, April 11 and Tuesday, April 12.

If you won’t be traveling to AACR, you can always take a virtual trip back in time with our popular archive articles, spotlighting important publications from the journal’s recent past.

Of course, the main attraction for the JITC digest is the exciting new papers in the current issue. This month we have two original research articles and a short report from the Clinical/Translational Cancer Immunotherapy section as well as original research from the Immunotherapy Biomarkers section.

Martina Svenja Lutz and colleagues describe a new mechanism of tumor immune escape from bispecific antibody treatment mediated by platelet activation.

A pan-cancer predictor for immune-related toxicity after anti-PD-1 monotherapy based on germline variants in microRNAs and their targets is identified by Joanne Weidhaas et al.

Treatment with anti-CCR4 leads to regulatory T cell depletion and meaningful tumor control in a canine clinical trial enrolling dogs with spontaneous prostate cancer reported by Shingo Maeda and colleagues.

Dipti Thakkar and colleagues demonstrate tumor control and microenvironment remodeling in multiple models with a first-in-class rationally targeted and non-depleting IgG4 isotype anti-VISTA antibody. After reading this comprehensive and meticulous work, be sure to continue your reading on VISTA and other promising targets in JITC’s Immune Checkpoints Beyond PD-1 Series.

Best regards,

Pedro J. Romero, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

Wednesday, February 16, 2022

Letter from the Editor - February

 


Hello JITC Readers,

pedro-romero_1__1_.jpgWelcome to the latest edition of the JITC digest, arriving in your inbox as the Winter Olympics are ongoing in Beijing, China. Perhaps our JITC readers may see some similarities between the biathletes’ precision target shooting and the specificity of CAR T cells eradicating tumors. While the thrill of reading a paper with provocative new data likely cannot compare to the adrenaline rush of landing a triple axel or speeding down a ski slope at a speed of more than 70 miles per hour, we know that JITC deserves a medal for the top-quality immunotherapy research appearing in the journal each month.

JITC would not even make it to the podium, however, without the volunteers who support the journal in a variety of capacities. This month’s special feature is dedicated to the family of JITC volunteers, including the anonymous peer reviewers who are so essential to maintaining the high standards of our journal and the social media editors who help spread the word about the latest immunotherapy research to a global audience.

The original research articles highlighted in this month’s digest feature three novel mechanisms to heat up cold tumors and one surprising strategy to potentiate adoptive cell therapies.

Alycia Gardner and colleagues reveal a new function for TIM-3 blockade in reorganization of the tumor microenvironment leading to enhanced functionality of intratumoral cytotoxic T cells.

Immune exclusion in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is overcome by a novel bioavailable scavenger reagent by Francesco De Sanctis et al, who also provide evidence that telomerase expression may be amenable to targeting via adoptive cell therapy in this disease.

An engineered IL-2 with extended serum half-life and negligible binding to the high affinity receptor expressed on T regulatory cells is demonstrated to offer robust tumor control as monotherapy and in combination with anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 in multiple pre-clinical models by Rosemina Merchant and colleagues.

B cells are identified as necessary and sufficient for potentiation of adoptive cell therapies expanded in the presence of toll-like receptor 9 agonists, further adding to our emerging understanding of the role of non-CD8+ T cells in immunotherapy efficacy.

Warm Regards,

Pedro J. Romero, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Letter From the Editor - January


Hello JITC Readers,

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Welcome to the New Year and one that happens to be of great significance to the journal, as JITC will celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2022. It is humbling to look back on how far JITC has come in the past 10 years, and we are all excited for what the future holds.
Of course, it is the top-caliber articles published in JITC that have supported the journal’s ascent to being among the most highly-ranked oncology and immunology journals. This past year was no exception, and we are highlighting some of the top-most accessed and downloaded articles from 2021 in this month’s special feature.
The original research spotlighted in this month’s digest offers new insights on a diverse array of emerging areas in the immunotherapy field.
Jinzhu Mao and colleagues offer a detailed metagenomic census of the gut microbiome in patients with hepatobiliary cancers being treated with immunotherapy, showing that the presence of many lower-level taxa is not “one-size-fits-all” for clinical benefit.
A novel feedback loop involving CCL18-mediated crosstalk between tumor-associated macrophages and ovarian carcinoma cells promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other invasive characteristics is described by Lingli Long et al.
Sub-cytotoxic doses of a metabolite of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan were demonstrated to enhance responses to anti-PD-1 via activation of FOXO3 and enhanced tumor infiltration of natural killer cells by Young Min Chung and colleagues.
Finally, Giuseppe Minniti et al present the results of a retrospective study indicating that the addition of immunotherapy to postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery reduces the risk of leptomeningeal disease for patients with melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases.
Looking forward to what is in store for 2022!
 
Best,

Pedro J. Romero, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

Wednesday, December 15, 2021

Letter From the Editor - December


Hello JITC Readers,

Welcome to the final JITC digest of 2021. This past year has not been without its challenges, but the immunotherapy field has also seen tremendous advancement. Checkpoint inhibitors are moving into the standard of care for an ever increasing number of tumor types as well as in earlier stages of disease and the number of approved CAR T cell products has more than doubled in the past year alone.
 

The journal has also progressed by leaps and bounds this year, and the more than three-point bump in JITC’s impact factor in 2021 reflects the high quality of research found in every issue. As the journal continues to grow and excel, I am excited to announce that James L. Gulley MD, PhD, FACP, has been appointed to the role of Deputy Editor-in-Chief. Be sure to read this month’s special feature for a biography of JITC’s new second-in-command and the extensive experience he brings to the role.

For the final digest of the year, we are highlighting four exemplary original research articles that offer innovative approaches for modulation of the tumor microenvironment.

Intratumoral immunotherapy is the focus of Yu-Chao Zhu and colleagues and Maite Alvarez et al. The first group demonstrate feasibility of intratumoral administration of an attenuated strain of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii leading to tumor rejection and immune memory. The second manuscript shows synergistic activity of a poly I:C derivative and a STING agonist even when injected into separate lesions.

New mechanistic insight into mechanisms of immune evasion are also offered. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase is identified as a strategy to enhance efficacy of anti-PD-1 against the immunologically cold tumor pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma by Allison A. Fitzgerald et al. A new soluble immune checkpoint, chitinase 3-like-1, is revealed as an inhibitor of natural killer (NK) cell antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by Abbass Darwich and colleagues.

With well-wishes for the holidays and optimism for what 2022 will bring.
 
Best regards,

Pedro J. Romero, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

To view the entire April 2021 JITC Digest, please click here

Tuesday, December 14, 2021

Meet JITC’s New Deputy Editor-in-Chief: James L. Gulley, MD, PhD, FACP

Given the continuing growth of JITC, the position of Deputy Editor-in-Chief has been added to JITC’s leadership to support the JITC Editor-in-Chief in leading the strategic and editorial direction of the journal, serving as second-in-command of the Editorial Board. JITC is proud to announce the appointment of Dr. James L. Gulley as JITC’s inaugural Deputy Editor-in-Chief. 

Dr. Gulley has served as a Section Editor for JITC’s Clinical/Translational Cancer Immunotherapy section since 2017. Dr. Gulley has been instrumental in preparing for, responding to, and managing the growth of what is JITC’s largest section over the past four years. With his leadership and strategic insights, the section welcomed the addition of a second Section Editor, was the first to introduce Deputy Editor roles at a section level, and expanded its Associate Editor representation. He also received the 2021 Pedro J. Romero Service to JITC Award in November 2021. 

After graduating from Loma Linda University in California with a PhD in microbiology in 1994 and an MD in 1995, he completed a dissertation on tumor immunology as part of the eight-year MD/PhD Medical Scientist Training Program. He then completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Emory University in 1998, followed by a Medical Oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). 

Dr. Gulley serves within the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) of the National Cancer Institute as Chief of the Genitourinary Malignancies Branch (GMB), the Director of the Medical Oncology Service (CCR), Deputy Director of the CCR, and as Head of the Immunotherapy Section within the GMB, as well as serving on many national and NIH boards and committees. He has been instrumental in the clinical development of multiple immunotherapeutic agents and has led numerous first-in-human immunotherapy studies through phase III clinical trials. Dr. Gulley was the coordinating PI of an international trial of avelumab that led to regulatory approval. He was also the PI of the first-in-human international study of a first-in-class agent, bintrafusp alfa, which targets PD-L1 and TGF-beta. Additionally, Dr. Gulley leads a number of rationally designed, cutting edge combination immunotherapy studies, and has served as an investigator on about 200 clinical trials, while authoring over 350 scientific papers or chapters which have been cited over 20,000 times. He has made hundreds of scientific presentations at universities and national and international meetings.

For his outstanding research, in addition to garnering 10 NCI or NIH Director’s Awards, Dr. Gulley has received numerous accolades, including the 2010 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest award bestowed by the US President on investigators early in their careers. Dr. Gulley was also awarded the 2018 Hubert H. Humphrey Award for Service to America for contributing to the health, safety, and well-being of the nation by helping to get FDA approval for avelumab for Merkel cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma.



Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Letter From the Editor - November


Hello JITC Readers,

I want to begin this edition of the JITC digest by thanking everybody who stopped by the meet-the-editor session at the booth at SITC’s 36th Annual Meeting and Pre-Conference Programs—it was wonderful to see JITC readers in vivo and discuss cutting-edge science in person.

One of the highlights of the meeting was presenting awards to the authors of the best papers published in JITC over the past year. You can find links to the award-winning papers across categories in this month’s special feature. Of course, selecting just one paper from each category for the prize was a difficult task given the exceptional quality of research in the journal, so be sure to browse some of the popular papers from the archives for further reading.

I also want to extend a heartfelt congratulations to James L. Gulley, MD, PhD, FACP on receiving the 2021 Pedro J. Romero Service to JITC Award. James is not only an outstanding clinician-scientist, but also an insightful and generous colleague whose vision has been invaluable in making JITC the top-tier journal it is today.

Also central to JITC’s continued upward trajectory are the high-quality papers published each month, and the highlights in this edition are no exception.

Microsatellite stable colorectal and pancreatic cancers have historically been unamenable to immunotherapy approaches, yet Meggy Suarez-Carmona and colleagues report promising results from a phase I/II trial evaluating pembrolizumab plus antagonism of CXCL12 for these challenging tumors.

The groundwork for a universal donor platform for adoptive cell therapies is set by Marie Tourret et al who demonstrate that the mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells that recognize microbial riboflavin-derived antigens have virtually zero alloreactive potential.

Compelling data to inform sequencing decisions for first-line ipilimumab plus nivolumab over BRAF/MEK inhibition for the treatment of BRAF-mutant melanoma brain metastases is provided by Peter Kar Han Lau and colleagues who find very low response rates with combination immunotherapy and evidence for resistance to anti-PD-1 in tumors treated with dabrafenib plus trametinib.

Finally, Carla S Walti et al find evidence for immunogenicity of seasonal flu vaccines in CAR T cell therapy recipients, although a relatively weak humoral response suggests additional infection-prevention strategies are needed for this vulnerable population.

Thank you, JITC readers for your continued support of the journal, and if we were not able to connect in person at SITC 2021 then I hope we can look forward to the next meeting in 2022.
 
Best,

Pedro J. Romero, MD
Editor-in-Chief, Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer

To view the entire April 2021 JITC Digest, please click here

Saturday, November 13, 2021

SITC AMPCP 2021 Scientific Highlights – Saturday 11/13/21

 Off-the-shelf CAR NK cells potently control multiple tumor types

(117) FT536 Path to IND: Ubiquitous targeting of solid tumors with an off-the-shelf, first-of-kind MICA/B-specific CAR-ink cellular immunotherapy

Bryan Hancock, PhD (Fate Therapeutics) previewed the preclinical studies supporting the investigational new drug application for FT536, a CAR NK cell product derived from an inducible pluripotent stem-cell line engineered for enhanced effector cell functionality, persistence, and multi-antigen targeting capabilities through CD16-mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). FT536 carries a CAR targeting the pan-tumor associated antigens MICA and MICB (MICA/B) and the product can be consistently and uniformly produced as well as cryopreserved at clinical scale. Potent and persistent antigen-specific cytotoxicty was demonstrated against an array of solid and hematological tumor lines. Activity of FT536 was further augmented when combined with chemotherapies and/or radiation that induced surface MICA/B expression. Multi-targeting through the CAR and CD16-mediated ADCC was also demonstrated when FT536 was combined with trastuzumab or cetuximab for HER2- or EGFR-expressing tumors, respectively. In xenograft models, directly thawed frozen FT536 significantly slowed tumor growth, which was further enhanced when infused in combination with the monoclonal antibodies. Sustained persistence of FT536 for 33 days post-infusion were also seen in a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma. These preclinical findings support further development of FT536 as a universal adoptive cell therapy.

 

 

Anti-CD47 shrinks breast cancer brain metastases

(270) Anti-CD47 immunotherapy as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of breast cancer brain metastasis

Jessica D. Mackert, PhD (Wake Forest University) described preclinical data supporting CD47 as a target for the treatment of brain metastases in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The “don’t eat me signal” CD47 is a pleitropic surface marker expressed on numerous cell types that inhibits myeloid cell phagocytic activity through binding SIRPalpha as well as an antagonizes T cell function mediated by interaction with matricellular protein Thrombospondin-1. Patient biopsies revealed an 89% increase in CD47 expression by immunohistochemistry in metastatic brain TNBC tumors compared to primary lesions. In mice bearing brain metastatic 4T1br3 tumors, anti-CD47 treatment shrank tumors by roughly 50% compared to controls, which accompanied by a 5-fold increase in expression of F4/80 macrophage markers in the tumors. A total of 318 differentially expressed genes were associated with anti-CD47 treatment, with enrichment for reduced signatures of extracellular matrix remodeling and upregluation of pathways involved in tertiary lymphoid structure formation. Knockout of CD47 led to 60% increased survival and 89% decreased metastatic brain lesions in 4T1-bearing mice compared to controls. This preclinical data supports CD47 as a potential target for the immunotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases.

 

 

DNA vaccine plus pembrolizumab for metastatic prostate cancer

(350) Phase II trial of a DNA vaccine with pembrolizumab in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC)

Douglas G. McNeel, MD, PhD (Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin) presented the final analyses from Arms 3 and 4 of a phase I/II study evaluating the pTVG-HP prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) DNA vaccine in combination with pembrolizumab for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In arm 3, the PAP DNA vaccine was given every 3 weeks (with pembrolizumab every 3 weeks) and in Arm 2, the vaccine was given every 2 weeks (with pembrolizumab every 4 weeks). The median time to progression (TTP) at the time of abstract preparation was 5.3 months for Arm 3 and 8.0 months for Arm 4. Updated 6-month disease control rates presented at the meeting were 10% and 45% of patients in Arms 3 and 4, respectively. Treatment-related adverse events ≥ grade 2 occurred at a rate of 42% across arms, and development of an immune-related adverse event was associated with prolonged TTP. Persistent increases in serum levels of interferon gamma and granzyme B were observed in both Arms (6/20 patients in Arm 4 and 2/20 patients in Arm B). These data suggest that the generation of tumor-antigen-specific T cells through vaccination may help overcome primary resistance to anti-PD-1 monotherapy in prostate cancer.   

 

 

Ibrutinib enhances CLL CAR-T cell therapy 

(449) Concurrent ibrutinib enhances T cell function in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treated with lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel), a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy

Jerill Thorpe, MS (Bristol Myers Squibb) described translational data supporting potential synergy between Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors (BTKi) and CAR T cell therapy in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Using a novel low-input RNA-seq method, CAR-positive and endogenous T cells were isolated from the patients treated in the TRANSCEND CLL 004 study, which evaluated the CD19-directed CAR T cell product lisocabtagene maraleucel (liso-cel) given with the BTKi ibrutinib (n = 19) or as monotherapy (n = 16). At 1 and 2 months post-liso-cel infusion, both populations of cells in the combination ibrutinib plus liso-cel group demonstrated positive enrichment for expression of cell proliferation genes and negative enrichment for expression of inflammation-associated genes compared to what was seen with monotherapy, though the extent was lesser in the endogenous lymphocytes. Increased CAR+ T cell expansion, reduced serum IL-6, and increased and sustained CLL ibrutinib gene expression score—which has previously been correlated with higher rates of undetectable minimal residual disease and longer progression-free survival—was also seen in the combination group. The expression of T cell exhaustion genes was reduced in CAR-positive cells from the combination group, which was associated with improved progression-free survival. These findings suggest that the addition of ibrutinib to CAR T cell therapy for CLL.  

 

 

TIL therapy plus pembrolizumab leads to durable responses

(492) Phase 2 efficacy and safety of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) cell therapy in combination with pembrolizumab in immune checkpoint inhibitor-naïve patients with advanced cancers

David O’Malley, MD (Ohio State University) reported early efficacy and safety results from two ongoing multicenter phase II clinical trials investigating autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy combined with pembrolizumab for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), melanoma, and cervical cancer. Patients’ tumors were first resected for TIL isolation and manufacturing, followed by one dose of pembrolizumab, lymphodepletion, TIL infusion intravenous IL-2, and then continued pembrolizumab for ≤ 24 months. All enrolled patients had high tumor burdens. At median follow-up of 9.7 months, the objective response rates in the full analysis set presented at the meeting were 60%, 39%, and 57%, for patients with melanoma, HNSCC, and cervical cancer, respectively. Almost all efficacy-evaluable patients achieved a reduction in tumor burden. Ongoing durable responses at data cutoff were observed in 10 of 17 patients with objective tumor response. Reporting tolerable safety results thus far, the authors advocate for further investigation of this combination immunotherapy strategy as an early line of therapy option for patients with advanced solid tumors.

 

Intact lymph nodes are essential for checkpoint inhibitor efficacy

(601) Sequencing Immunotherapy before Lymphatic Ablation Unleashes cdc1-Dependent Antitumor Immunity in HNSCC

Robert Saddawi-Konefka, MD, PhD (UC San Diego) presented preclinical evidence to determine the best sequence of therapies for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) based on spatially distinct patterns of immune responses in cervical lymphatic basins. In murine models of neck dissection (ND) to remove orthotopic tobacco-signature HNSCC tumors, enrichment for conventional type I dendritic cells (cDC1)and type I interferon signaling was observed within the resected lymphatics. After ND, the tumor microenvironment was observed to be largely immunosuppressed, suggesting a loss of effector function after curative-intent surgery. Specifically, ND resulted in loss of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and increases in myeloid suppressive cells. Supporting this, poor immune responses were observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) following cervical lymphatic ablation. ICIs given neoadjuvantly, however, resulted in a systemic distribution of memory anti-tumor T cells, lymph node accumulation of cDC1, and complete responses in tumors. Interestingly, administration of ICIs prior to surgery was also associated with reduced occurrence of occult nodal metastases at late time points (1 week after the last ICI dose), but not when surgery was performed at an early time point (1 day after the last ICI dose) providing preclinical evidence for the importance of the draining lymph node in generation and maintenance of prolonged anti-tumor responses.

 

 

Safety data support COVID-19 vaccination for checkpoint inhibitor-treated patients

(625) COVID-19 vaccination in patients with renal cancer or melanoma receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors

Hannah E. Dzimitrowicz, MD (Duke University) described no increased incidence of immune-related adverse events nor severe side effects associated with COVID-19 vaccination for patients receiving checkpoint inhibitors—a population that was excluded from the registration trials leading to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Retrospective data on balanced cohorts of patients with renal cell carcinoma and melanoma undergoing checkpoint blockade therapy who received one dose of an FDA-approved vaccine was presented. Half of the patients were being treated with anti-PD-1 monotherapy at the time of vaccination. Among the 40% of patients being treated with immunotherapy combinations, 10% of patients were receiving anti-PD-1 plus anti-CTLA-4 and 28% had a regimen that included anti-PD-1 plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Higher rates of symptoms secondary to vaccination were reported by the ICI-treated patients, including fever, chills, arm pain, myalgias, lymphadenopathy, headache, and diarrhea, likely related to more frequent follow-up compared to the control group. The rates of new or worsening immune-related adverse events after vaccination was no higher than predicted by expected historical ICI-associated toxicity incidence rates. Only 12% of patients required a hold of checkpoint inhibitor therapy, steroids, or hospitalization due to immune-related toxicity. Some patients did develop COVID-19 after partial vaccination. Further studies with larger cohorts of patients are needed to assess efficacy of the approved COVID-19 vaccines in ICI-treated patients, yet these data indicate vaccination is safe for this vulnerable population.

 

STING agonism alters stroma to turn cold tumors hot

(758) High-potency synthetic STING agonists rewire the myeloid stroma in the tumour microenvironment to amplify immune checkpoint blockade efficacy in refractory pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

Akash R. Boda, MS (University of Texas MD Anderson UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences) provided the first detailed mechanistic characterization of how synthetic agonists of the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) adaptor protein perturb the myeloid stroma toward proinflammatory phenotypes. Multi-omics profiling on M2 macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells of both human and murine origin revealed that exposure to synthetic cyclic dinucleotides (high-potency agonists of STING) rewired these cell populations via inhibition of c-Myc signaling, alteration of energy metabolism away from fatty acid oxidation in favor of oxidative phosphorylation, and antagonism of proliferation. In orthotopic mouse models of KRAS-driven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)an immunologically cold tumor—intratumoral injection of synthetic cyclic dinucleotides concomitant with checkpoint blockade led to enhanced T and NK cell infiltration along with improved disease control. Multiparametric flow cytometry analysis of tumors from mice treated with the combination of STING agonists and checkpoint inhibitors confirmed that remodeling of the myeloid stroma toward proinflammatory phenotypes with accompanying enhancements in T cell function were both associated with therapeutic benefit. The study not only offers new insight into the mechanisms by which cyclic dinucleotides act as immune adjuvants for anti-tumor responses, but also highlight the potential of these compounds to reverse primary resistance to checkpoint blockade in immunologically cold tumors such as PDAC.

 

 

Skin toxicity predicts improved survival with checkpoint blockade

(814) Cutaneous Immune-related Adverse Events are Protective of Mortality in Patients Treated with anti-PD1 and anti-PDL1 therapy in a multi-institutional cohort study

Yevgeniy Semenov, MD (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School) presented a retrospective study that included 7,008 patients who developed cutaneous immune-related adverse events (cirAEs) within 6 months of treatment initiation of anti-PD-(L)1 therapy as well as 7,008 control-matched patients that did not experience skin toxicity. Landmark analyses at 6 months showed statistically significant improvement in overall survival among the patients who developed any cirAE as well as individual toxicities including nonspecific rashes, pruritus, drug eruption, and xerosis. Other cirAE morphologies also demonstrated a trend toward improved survival without reaching statistical significance. The onset of a cirAE within 3 months or 9 months of first dose of PD-(L)1 inhibitor was similarly associated with a reduced risk of death (HR 0.759, p < 0.0001 for a 3 month landmark time; HR 0.84, p < 0.0001 for a 9 months landmark time). These data suggest that many dermatologic irAEs may be predictive of survival benefit from anti-PD(L)1 therapy.  

 

 

Combination pembrolizumab plus oncolytic virus improves CR rates for NMIBC

(955) CORE1: Phase 2, Single Arm Study of CG0070 Combined with Pembrolizumab in Patients with Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

Roger Li, MD (Moffitt Cancer Center) reported early data from a phase II study of an intravesical oncolytic virus combined with systemic pembrolizumab therapy for the treatment of BCG-unresponsive non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). CG0070 is a GM-CSF-expressing adenovirus engineered to harbor the transcription factor E2F, which allows for preferential replication in tumor cells with defects in the tumor suppressor protein retinoblastoma—resulting in lysis and immunogenic cell death. Encouraging CR rates have been reported previously in separate studies of CG0070 and pembrolizumab monotherapies for NMIBC, and this is the first trial assessing a combination approach. The primary study endpoint is CR at 12 months, with secondary endpoints of CR at any time, progression-free survival, duration of response, cystectomy-free survival, and safety. At the time of abstract submission, 5 out of 5 assessed patients had achieved CR at 3 months, and there were no grade ≥ 3 adverse events reported. Updated data presented at the meeting confirmed the 100% CR rate at 3 months in 2 additional patients and demonstrated ongoing CRs at 6 and 9 months for the 2 and 6 patients for whom longer follow-up was available. These preliminary data support further evaluation of CG0070 plus pembrolizumab, a combination that has demonstrated unprecedented CR rates, has been well-tolerated to date and may exhibit synergistic anti-tumor effects.